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Synology DS212+

Dyskusja w 'Nowości i Nagrody' rozpoczęta przez użytkownika mikhnal, 5 Październik 2011.

Ładowanie...
  1. piotr.wloszynski
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    piotr.wloszynski Entry Technician Q Associate

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    to samo po wgraniu dodatkowo do /etc/i restarcie.
     
  2. Krwiak
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    Krwiak SysOp Administrator

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    Ciekawi mnie, który parametr się zmienia w plikach small, medium, huge i innodb?

    @piotr.wloszynski
    Jaki plik skopiowałeś ?
     
  3. mikhnal
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    mikhnal Guest

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  4. Krwiak
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    Krwiak SysOp Administrator

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    Ja mam plik my-innodb-heavy-4G.cnf bezpośrednio w /etc bo:

    Kod (Text):
    1. mysql database system will load my.cnf from /etc first and then try other path like /usr/syno/mysql
     
  5. mikhnal
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    mikhnal Guest

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    To ja jeszcze od siebie dodam, że wrzucając plik jako /etc/my.cnf ustawiamy opcje globalne, co jest opisane w ww plikach jako komentarz:

    Kod (Text):
    1. # You can copy this file to
    2. # /etc/my.cnf to set global options,
    3. # mysql-data-dir/my.cnf to set server-specific options (in this
    4. # installation this directory is /var/services/mysql) or
    5. # ~/.my.cnf to set user-specific options.
    6.  
     
  6. Krwiak
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    Krwiak SysOp Administrator

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    Poniżej zawartość mojego pliku:

    Kod (Text):
    1. #BEGIN CONFIG INFO
    2. #DESCR: 4GB RAM, InnoDB only, ACID, few connections, heavy queries
    3. #TYPE: SYSTEM
    4. #END CONFIG INFO
    5.  
    6. #
    7. # This is a MySQL example config file for systems with 4GB of memory
    8. # running mostly MySQL using InnoDB only tables and performing complex
    9. # queries with few connections.
    10. #
    11. # You can copy this file to /etc/my.cnf to set global options,
    12. # mysql-data-dir/my.cnf to set server-specific options
    13. # (/var/services/mysql for this installation) or to
    14. # ~/.my.cnf to set user-specific options.
    15. #
    16. # In this file, you can use all long options that a program supports.
    17. # If you want to know which options a program supports, run the program
    18. # with the "--help" option.
    19. #
    20. # More detailed information about the individual options can also be
    21. # found in the manual.
    22. #
    23.  
    24. #
    25. # The following options will be read by MySQL client applications.
    26. # Note that only client applications shipped by MySQL are guaranteed
    27. # to read this section. If you want your own MySQL client program to
    28. # honor these values, you need to specify it as an option during the
    29. # MySQL client library initialization.
    30. #
    31. #password   = [your_password]
    32. # *** Application-specific options follow here ***
    33. #
    34. # The MySQL server
    35. #
    36. [mysqld]
    37.  
    38. # generic configuration options
    39. port        = 3306
    40. socket      = /tmp/mysql.sock
    41.  
    42. # back_log is the number of connections the operating system can keep in
    43. # the listen queue, before the MySQL connection manager thread has
    44. # processed them. If you have a very high connection rate and experience
    45. # "connection refused" errors, you might need to increase this value.
    46. # Check your OS documentation for the maximum value of this parameter.
    47. # Attempting to set back_log higher than your operating system limit
    48. # will have no effect.
    49. back_log = 50
    50.  
    51. # Don't listen on a TCP/IP port at all. This can be a security
    52. # enhancement, if all processes that need to connect to mysqld run
    53. # on the same host.  All interaction with mysqld must be made via Unix
    54. # sockets or named pipes.
    55. # Note that using this option without enabling named pipes on Windows
    56. # (via the "enable-named-pipe" option) will render mysqld useless!
    57. #skip-networking
    58.  
    59. # The maximum amount of concurrent sessions the MySQL server will
    60. # allow. One of these connections will be reserved for a user with
    61. # SUPER privileges to allow the administrator to login even if the
    62. # connection limit has been reached.
    63. max_connections = 100
    64.  
    65. # Maximum amount of errors allowed per host. If this limit is reached,
    66. # the host will be blocked from connecting to the MySQL server until
    67. # "FLUSH HOSTS" has been run or the server was restarted. Invalid
    68. # passwords and other errors during the connect phase result in
    69. # increasing this value. See the "Aborted_connects" status variable for
    70. # global counter.
    71. max_connect_errors = 10
    72.  
    73. # The number of open tables for all threads. Increasing this value
    74. # increases the number of file descriptors that mysqld requires.
    75. # Therefore you have to make sure to set the amount of open files
    76. # allowed to at least 4096 in the variable "open-files-limit" in
    77. # section [mysqld_safe]
    78. table_open_cache = 2048
    79.  
    80. # Enable external file level locking. Enabled file locking will have a
    81. # negative impact on performance, so only use it in case you have
    82. # multiple database instances running on the same files (note some
    83. # restrictions still apply!) or if you use other software relying on
    84. # locking MyISAM tables on file level.
    85. #external-locking
    86.  
    87. # The maximum size of a query packet the server can handle as well as
    88. # maximum query size server can process (Important when working with
    89. # large BLOBs).  enlarged dynamically, for each connection.
    90. max_allowed_packet = 16M
    91.  
    92. # The size of the cache to hold the SQL statements for the binary log
    93. # during a transaction. If you often use big, multi-statement
    94. # transactions you can increase this value to get more performance. All
    95. # statements from transactions are buffered in the binary log cache and
    96. # are being written to the binary log at once after the COMMIT.  If the
    97. # transaction is larger than this value, temporary file on disk is used
    98. # instead.  This buffer is allocated per connection on first update
    99. # statement in transaction
    100. binlog_cache_size = 1M
    101.  
    102. # Maximum allowed size for a single HEAP (in memory) table. This option
    103. # is a protection against the accidential creation of a very large HEAP
    104. # table which could otherwise use up all memory resources.
    105. max_heap_table_size = 64M
    106.  
    107. # Sort buffer is used to perform sorts for some ORDER BY and GROUP BY
    108. # queries. If sorted data does not fit into the sort buffer, a disk
    109. # based merge sort is used instead - See the "Sort_merge_passes"
    110. # status variable. Allocated per thread if sort is needed.
    111. sort_buffer_size = 8M
    112.  
    113. # This buffer is used for the optimization of full JOINs (JOINs without
    114. # indexes). Such JOINs are very bad for performance in most cases
    115. # anyway, but setting this variable to a large value reduces the
    116. # performance impact. See the "Select_full_join" status variable for a
    117. # count of full JOINs. Allocated per thread if full join is found
    118. join_buffer_size = 8M
    119.  
    120. # How many threads we should keep in a cache for reuse. When a client
    121. # disconnects, the client's threads are put in the cache if there aren't
    122. # more than thread_cache_size threads from before.  This greatly reduces
    123. # the amount of thread creations needed if you have a lot of new
    124. # connections. (Normally this doesn't give a notable performance
    125. # improvement if you have a good thread implementation.)
    126. thread_cache_size = 8
    127.  
    128. # This permits the application to give the threads system a hint for the
    129. # desired number of threads that should be run at the same time.  This
    130. # value only makes sense on systems that support the thread_concurrency()
    131. # function call (Sun Solaris, for example).
    132. # You should try [number of CPUs]*(2..4) for thread_concurrency
    133. thread_concurrency = 8
    134.  
    135. # Query cache is used to cache SELECT results and later return them
    136. # without actual executing the same query once again. Having the query
    137. # cache enabled may result in significant speed improvements, if your
    138. # have a lot of identical queries and rarely changing tables. See the
    139. # "Qcache_lowmem_prunes" status variable to check if the current value
    140. # is high enough for your load.
    141. # Note: In case your tables change very often or if your queries are
    142. # textually different every time, the query cache may result in a
    143. # slowdown instead of a performance improvement.
    144. query_cache_size = 64M
    145.  
    146. # Only cache result sets that are smaller than this limit. This is to
    147. # protect the query cache of a very large result set overwriting all
    148. # other query results.
    149. query_cache_limit = 2M
    150.  
    151. # Minimum word length to be indexed by the full text search index.
    152. # You might wish to decrease it if you need to search for shorter words.
    153. # Note that you need to rebuild your FULLTEXT index, after you have
    154. # modified this value.
    155. ft_min_word_len = 4
    156.  
    157. # If your system supports the memlock() function call, you might want to
    158. # enable this option while running MySQL to keep it locked in memory and
    159. # to avoid potential swapping out in case of high memory pressure. Good
    160. # for performance.
    161. #memlock
    162.  
    163. # Table type which is used by default when creating new tables, if not
    164. # specified differently during the CREATE TABLE statement.
    165. default-storage-engine = MYISAM
    166.  
    167. # Thread stack size to use. This amount of memory is always reserved at
    168. # connection time. MySQL itself usually needs no more than 64K of
    169. # memory, while if you use your own stack hungry UDF functions or your
    170. # OS requires more stack for some operations, you might need to set this
    171. # to a higher value.
    172. thread_stack = 192K
    173.  
    174. # Set the default transaction isolation level. Levels available are:
    175. # READ-UNCOMMITTED, READ-COMMITTED, REPEATABLE-READ, SERIALIZABLE
    176. transaction_isolation = REPEATABLE-READ
    177.  
    178. # Maximum size for internal (in-memory) temporary tables. If a table
    179. # grows larger than this value, it is automatically converted to disk
    180. # based table This limitation is for a single table. There can be many
    181. # of them.
    182. tmp_table_size = 64M
    183.  
    184. # Enable binary logging. This is required for acting as a MASTER in a
    185. # replication configuration. You also need the binary log if you need
    186. # the ability to do point in time recovery from your latest backup.
    187. log-bin=mysql-bin
    188.  
    189. # binary logging format - mixed recommended
    190. binlog_format=mixed
    191.  
    192. # If you're using replication with chained slaves (A->B->C), you need to
    193. # enable this option on server B. It enables logging of updates done by
    194. # the slave thread into the slave's binary log.
    195. #log_slave_updates
    196.  
    197. # Enable the full query log. Every query (even ones with incorrect
    198. # syntax) that the server receives will be logged. This is useful for
    199. # debugging, it is usually disabled in production use.
    200. #log
    201.  
    202. # Print warnings to the error log file.  If you have any problem with
    203. # MySQL you should enable logging of warnings and examine the error log
    204. # for possible explanations.
    205. #log_warnings
    206.  
    207. # Log slow queries. Slow queries are queries which take more than the
    208. # amount of time defined in "long_query_time" or which do not use
    209. # indexes well, if log_short_format is not enabled. It is normally good idea
    210. # to have this turned on if you frequently add new queries to the
    211. # system.
    212. slow_query_log
    213.  
    214. # All queries taking more than this amount of time (in seconds) will be
    215. # trated as slow. Do not use "1" as a value here, as this will result in
    216. # even very fast queries being logged from time to time (as MySQL
    217. # currently measures time with second accuracy only).
    218. long_query_time = 2
    219.  
    220. # The directory used by MySQL for storing temporary files. For example,
    221. # it is used to perform disk based large sorts, as well as for internal
    222. # and explicit temporary tables. It might be good to put it on a
    223. # swapfs/tmpfs filesystem, if you do not create very large temporary
    224. # files. Alternatively you can put it on dedicated disk. You can
    225. # specify multiple paths here by separating them by ";" - they will then
    226. # be used in a round-robin fashion.
    227. #tmpdir = /tmp
    228.  
    229.  
    230. # ***  Replication related settings
    231.  
    232.  
    233. # Unique server identification number between 1 and 2^32-1. This value
    234. # is required for both master and slave hosts. It defaults to 1 if
    235. # "master-host" is not set, but will MySQL will not function as a master
    236. # if it is omitted.
    237. server-id = 1
    238.  
    239. # Replication Slave (comment out master section to use this)
    240. #
    241. # To configure this host as a replication slave, you can choose between
    242. # two methods :
    243. #
    244. # 1) Use the CHANGE MASTER TO command (fully described in our manual) -
    245. #    the syntax is:
    246. #
    247. #    CHANGE MASTER TO MASTER_HOST=<host>, MASTER_PORT=<port>,
    248. #    MASTER_USER=<user>, MASTER_PASSWORD=<password> ;
    249. #
    250. #    where you replace <host>, <user>, <password> by quoted strings and
    251. #    <port> by the master's port number (3306 by default).
    252. #
    253. #    Example:
    254. #
    255. #    CHANGE MASTER TO MASTER_HOST='125.564.12.1', MASTER_PORT=3306,
    256. #    MASTER_USER='joe', MASTER_PASSWORD='secret';
    257. #
    258. # OR
    259. #
    260. # 2) Set the variables below. However, in case you choose this method, then
    261. #    start replication for the first time (even unsuccessfully, for example
    262. #    if you mistyped the password in master-password and the slave fails to
    263. #    connect), the slave will create a master.info file, and any later
    264. #    changes in this file to the variable values below will be ignored and
    265. #    overridden by the content of the master.info file, unless you shutdown
    266. #    the slave server, delete master.info and restart the slaver server.
    267. #    For that reason, you may want to leave the lines below untouched
    268. #    (commented) and instead use CHANGE MASTER TO (see above)
    269. #
    270. # required unique id between 2 and 2^32 - 1
    271. # (and different from the master)
    272. # defaults to 2 if master-host is set
    273. # but will not function as a slave if omitted
    274. #server-id = 2
    275. #
    276. # The replication master for this slave - required
    277. #master-host = <hostname>
    278. #
    279. # The username the slave will use for authentication when connecting
    280. # to the master - required
    281. #master-user = <username>
    282. #
    283. # The password the slave will authenticate with when connecting to
    284. # the master - required
    285. #master-password = <password>
    286. #
    287. # The port the master is listening on.
    288. # optional - defaults to 3306
    289. #master-port = <port>
    290.  
    291. # Make the slave read-only. Only users with the SUPER privilege and the
    292. # replication slave thread will be able to modify data on it. You can
    293. # use this to ensure that no applications will accidently modify data on
    294. # the slave instead of the master
    295. #read_only
    296.  
    297.  
    298. #*** MyISAM Specific options
    299.  
    300.  
    301. # Size of the Key Buffer, used to cache index blocks for MyISAM tables.
    302. # Do not set it larger than 30% of your available memory, as some memory
    303. # is also required by the OS to cache rows. Even if you're not using
    304. # MyISAM tables, you should still set it to 8-64M as it will also be
    305. # used for internal temporary disk tables.
    306. key_buffer_size = 32M
    307.  
    308. # Size of the buffer used for doing full table scans of MyISAM tables.
    309. # Allocated per thread, if a full scan is needed.
    310. read_buffer_size = 2M
    311.  
    312. # When reading rows in sorted order after a sort, the rows are read
    313. # through this buffer to avoid disk seeks. You can improve ORDER BY
    314. # performance a lot, if set this to a high value.
    315. # Allocated per thread, when needed.
    316. read_rnd_buffer_size = 16M
    317.  
    318. # MyISAM uses special tree-like cache to make bulk inserts (that is,
    319. # INSERT ... SELECT, INSERT ... VALUES (...), (...), ..., and LOAD DATA
    320. # INFILE) faster. This variable limits the size of the cache tree in
    321. # bytes per thread. Setting it to 0 will disable this optimisation.  Do
    322. # not set it larger than "key_buffer_size" for optimal performance.
    323. # This buffer is allocated when a bulk insert is detected.
    324. bulk_insert_buffer_size = 64M
    325.  
    326. # This buffer is allocated when MySQL needs to rebuild the index in
    327. # REPAIR, OPTIMIZE, ALTER table statements as well as in LOAD DATA INFILE
    328. # into an empty table. It is allocated per thread so be careful with
    329. # large settings.
    330. myisam_sort_buffer_size = 128M
    331.  
    332. # The maximum size of the temporary file MySQL is allowed to use while
    333. # recreating the index (during REPAIR, ALTER TABLE or LOAD DATA INFILE.
    334. # If the file-size would be bigger than this, the index will be created
    335. # through the key cache (which is slower).
    336. myisam_max_sort_file_size = 10G
    337.  
    338. # If a table has more than one index, MyISAM can use more than one
    339. # thread to repair them by sorting in parallel. This makes sense if you
    340. # have multiple CPUs and plenty of memory.
    341. myisam_repair_threads = 1
    342.  
    343. # Automatically check and repair not properly closed MyISAM tables.
    344. myisam_recover
    345.  
    346. # *** INNODB Specific options ***
    347.  
    348. # Use this option if you have a MySQL server with InnoDB support enabled
    349. # but you do not plan to use it. This will save memory and disk space
    350. # and speed up some things.
    351. #skip-innodb
    352.  
    353. # Additional memory pool that is used by InnoDB to store metadata
    354. # information.  If InnoDB requires more memory for this purpose it will
    355. # start to allocate it from the OS.  As this is fast enough on most
    356. # recent operating systems, you normally do not need to change this
    357. # value. SHOW INNODB STATUS will display the current amount used.
    358. innodb_additional_mem_pool_size = 16M
    359.  
    360. # InnoDB, unlike MyISAM, uses a buffer pool to cache both indexes and
    361. # row data. The bigger you set this the less disk I/O is needed to
    362. # access data in tables. On a dedicated database server you may set this
    363. # parameter up to 80% of the machine physical memory size. Do not set it
    364. # too large, though, because competition of the physical memory may
    365. # cause paging in the operating system.  Note that on 32bit systems you
    366. # might be limited to 2-3.5G of user level memory per process, so do not
    367. # set it too high.
    368. innodb_buffer_pool_size = 2G
    369.  
    370. # InnoDB stores data in one or more data files forming the tablespace.
    371. # If you have a single logical drive for your data, a single
    372. # autoextending file would be good enough. In other cases, a single file
    373. # per device is often a good choice. You can configure InnoDB to use raw
    374. # disk partitions as well - please refer to the manual for more info
    375. # about this.
    376. innodb_data_file_path = ibdata1:10M:autoextend
    377.  
    378. # Set this option if you would like the InnoDB tablespace files to be
    379. # stored in another location. By default this is the MySQL datadir.
    380. #innodb_data_home_dir = <directory>
    381.  
    382. # Number of IO threads to use for async IO operations. This value is
    383. # hardcoded to 4 on Unix, but on Windows disk I/O may benefit from a
    384. # larger number.
    385. innodb_file_io_threads = 4
    386.  
    387. # If you run into InnoDB tablespace corruption, setting this to a nonzero
    388. # value will likely help you to dump your tables. Start from value 1 and
    389. # increase it until you're able to dump the table successfully.
    390. #innodb_force_recovery=1
    391.  
    392. # Number of threads allowed inside the InnoDB kernel. The optimal value
    393. # depends highly on the application, hardware as well as the OS
    394. # scheduler properties. A too high value may lead to thread thrashing.
    395. innodb_thread_concurrency = 16
    396.  
    397. # If set to 1, InnoDB will flush (fsync) the transaction logs to the
    398. # disk at each commit, which offers full ACID behavior. If you are
    399. # willing to compromise this safety, and you are running small
    400. # transactions, you may set this to 0 or 2 to reduce disk I/O to the
    401. # logs. Value 0 means that the log is only written to the log file and
    402. # the log file flushed to disk approximately once per second. Value 2
    403. # means the log is written to the log file at each commit, but the log
    404. # file is only flushed to disk approximately once per second.
    405. innodb_flush_log_at_trx_commit = 1
    406.  
    407. # Speed up InnoDB shutdown. This will disable InnoDB to do a full purge
    408. # and insert buffer merge on shutdown. It may increase shutdown time a
    409. # lot, but InnoDB will have to do it on the next startup instead.
    410. #innodb_fast_shutdown
    411.  
    412. # The size of the buffer InnoDB uses for buffering log data. As soon as
    413. # it is full, InnoDB will have to flush it to disk. As it is flushed
    414. # once per second anyway, it does not make sense to have it very large
    415. # (even with long transactions).
    416. innodb_log_buffer_size = 8M
    417.  
    418. # Size of each log file in a log group. You should set the combined size
    419. # of log files to about 25%-100% of your buffer pool size to avoid
    420. # unneeded buffer pool flush activity on log file overwrite. However,
    421. # note that a larger logfile size will increase the time needed for the
    422. # recovery process.
    423. innodb_log_file_size = 256M
    424.  
    425. # Total number of files in the log group. A value of 2-3 is usually good
    426. # enough.
    427. innodb_log_files_in_group = 3
    428.  
    429. # Location of the InnoDB log files. Default is the MySQL datadir. You
    430. # may wish to point it to a dedicated hard drive or a RAID1 volume for
    431. # improved performance
    432. #innodb_log_group_home_dir
    433.  
    434. # Maximum allowed percentage of dirty pages in the InnoDB buffer pool.
    435. # If it is reached, InnoDB will start flushing them out agressively to
    436. # not run out of clean pages at all. This is a soft limit, not
    437. # guaranteed to be held.
    438. innodb_max_dirty_pages_pct = 90
    439.  
    440. # The flush method InnoDB will use for Log. The tablespace always uses
    441. # doublewrite flush logic. The default value is "fdatasync", another
    442. # option is "O_DSYNC".
    443. #innodb_flush_method=O_DSYNC
    444.  
    445. # How long an InnoDB transaction should wait for a lock to be granted
    446. # before being rolled back. InnoDB automatically detects transaction
    447. # deadlocks in its own lock table and rolls back the transaction. If you
    448. # use the LOCK TABLES command, or other transaction-safe storage engines
    449. # than InnoDB in the same transaction, then a deadlock may arise which
    450. # InnoDB cannot notice. In cases like this the timeout is useful to
    451. # resolve the situation.
    452. innodb_lock_wait_timeout = 120
    453.  
    454.  
    455. [mysqldump]
    456. # Do not buffer the whole result set in memory before writing it to
    457. # file. Required for dumping very large tables
    458. quick
    459.  
    460. max_allowed_packet = 16M
    461.  
    462. [mysql]
    463. no-auto-rehash
    464.  
    465. # Only allow UPDATEs and DELETEs that use keys.
    466. #safe-updates
    467.  
    468. [myisamchk]
    469. key_buffer_size = 512M
    470. sort_buffer_size = 512M
    471. read_buffer = 8M
    472. write_buffer = 8M
    473.  
    474. [mysqlhotcopy]
    475. interactive-timeout
    476.  
    477. [mysqld_safe]
    478. # Increase the amount of open files allowed per process. Warning: Make
    479. # sure you have set the global system limit high enough! The high value
    480. # is required for a large number of opened tables
    481. open-files-limit = 8192
     
  7. Krwiak
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    Krwiak SysOp Administrator

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  8. Piotrek
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    Piotrek System Engineer Q Specialist

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    Synology DS 212
    http://epasystemy.pl/pl/synology-ds212.html
    Wydajność: odczyt (110 MB/sek) - zapis (55 MB/sek)
    Procesor: 1.6GHz
    Pamięć SDRAM: 256MB,
    Cena: 1 131,00 zł

    Synology DS 212+
    http://epasystemy.pl/pl/synology-ds212-675.html
    Wydajność: odczyt (109 MB/sek) - zapis (56 MB/sek)
    Procesor: 1.6GHz
    Pamięc SDRAM: 512MB
    Cena: 1 444,20 zł

    Czemu przy porównywalnej wydajności (wg. strony) różnica w cenie jest, aż tak wysoka? Zdawało mi się że model 212+ różni się oprócz pamięci RAM jeszcze procesorem - 2.0GHz - według dokumentacji na forum. Na dobrą sprawę w takim razie DS 211+ nie różni się od DS 212+ może poza tym USB 3.0 (wg. opisu w sklepie).
    211+ już nie ma?
     
  9. Krwiak
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    Krwiak SysOp Administrator

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    Nie ma, ale z tego co widzę, że to sciema bo CPU i RAM jest ten sam, w DS212+ dodali USB 3.0 natomiast w DS212 dodali USB 3.0 i zmienili obudowę, więc tak naprawdę jest to chwyt PR, że niby nowe modele, że firma się rozwija :)

    No, ale ceny są takie same jak na stare modele więc nie ma co narzekać.
     
  10. Piotrek
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    Piotrek System Engineer Q Specialist

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    Czyli w DS 212+ nie ma procka 2.0GHz? :-(
    DS 212 od wersji "z plusem" różni się tylko RAMem i tym 1MB przy odczycie i zapisie w jedną czy drugą stronę?
     
  11. mikhnal
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    mikhnal Guest

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    A mnie się jednak wydaje, że jest błąd w szybkości procka modelu DS212+ na stronie EPA. W PDF'ie stoi jasno, że proc ma 2,0 GHz.

    Może ktoś uruchomić terminal na tym modelu i wpisać:
    Kod (Text):
    1. cat /proc/cpuinfo
     
  12. Krwiak
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    Krwiak SysOp Administrator

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    Tak masz racje, powinien być 2 GHz,
     
  13. Piotrek
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    Piotrek System Engineer Q Specialist

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    Mamy rację ;) :)

    Jeżeli byłoby inaczej to korzystniej wypadłby QNAP 219P II.

    @Krwiak - Jeszcze taka uwaga odnośnie sklepu. W kategorii http://epasystemy.pl/category/pl/serwery-synology nie ma DS 212 na liście. Czy na grudniowe święta szykują się jakieś promocje? :D Odnośnie tej dodatkowej licencji na kamerkę to na ile kamer ona jest - na 1 czy na 4?
     
  14. mpl
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    mpl Enterprise Admin... Q's Architect

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    No chyba jest napisane na "kamerę" wiec przypuszczam, że chodzi o jedną ...
     
  15. Piotrek
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    Piotrek System Engineer Q Specialist

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    @mpl - No chyba jest też obrazek na którym jest "1", ale też i "4".

    Pamiętam że jeszcze jakiś czas temu licencja kosztowała niecałe 100zł. Jeżeli ta cena jest za jedną licencję to jest jakieś nie porozumienie, bo tandetną, ale jednak kamerę IP można mieć za 200-300zł, a poza tym nie wierzę, aby cena tej 1 podstawowej wliczonej w cenę np. DS 110j tyle wynosiła, bo jeżeli się nie mylę to ok. 40% całości.
     
  16. Krwiak
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    Krwiak SysOp Administrator

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    Znowu zaczynasz, tak cena jest za jedną licencję, i na tyle wycenia swoją pracę firma Synology. Kamera za 200zł to tak jak napisałeś to tandeta do tego nie masz pewności, że będzie współpracować z Synology.
     
  17. Piotrek
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    Piotrek System Engineer Q Specialist

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    @Krwiak - Korzystam tylko i wyłącznie z własnego prawa do krytyki :). Niczego "znowu" nie zaczynam to tylko moja prywatna opinia.

    Nie obraź się za link, ale Synology taniej "wycenia swoją pracę", a sądzę tak na podstawie tego http://www.amazon.com/Synology-IP-Camera-License-Pack/dp/B001MJ0JAO - 57.44$ * 3.15 = 180.94zł (Niby różnica też tylko ok. 30zł - ale to zmienia postać, gdy robi się u Ciebie większe zakupy).

    Daleko mi od tego, aby rozpocząć z tobą jakąś wojnę, więc nie traktuj mojej wypowiedzi ostro. Co ja poradzę, piszę to co myślę. Czasami się mylę jak każdy ;).

    Odnośnie tanich kamer to podobno Foscam'y dają radę. Ja ostatnio zainwestowałem w Brickcom'a - też nie tania kamera, ale póki co nie żałuję. Jakość wykonania bdb. Obraz db.
     
  18. Krwiak
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    Krwiak SysOp Administrator

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    Oczywiście możesz kupić u nich i zaoszczędzić 30zł, problem zacznie się jak coś nie będzie działać wtedy będziesz też dzwonił do Amazona po pomoc ?
     
  19. grzegorzsa
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    grzegorzsa Network Architect Q's Professional

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    Synology:
    DS710+, DS411+
    A co to wnosi do forum?
     
  20. meaple
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    meaple Passing Basics Beginner

    Dołączył:
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    null 1 GbE
    Mam pytanie,
    Czy warto zmieniac DS210+ na DS212+? 210tka dziala mi bez zarzutow (ok 1,5 roku) no moze moglaby szybciej miniaturki tworzyc i zastanawiam sie czy jest sens, czy nie bedzie lepiej zajechac go jeszcze przez jakis czas?
     
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